Home > Birding > Birding Galveston – Day 2, Part 1: Bolivar Point

Birding Galveston – Day 2, Part 1: Bolivar Point

I am splitting this day into two parts, because of the large number of photos. There won’t be alot of text here, mostly photos. When you’re standing in one spot, there’s really not a lot of dialogue to go with it. All the photos for this day are in the gallery. I can only hope I identified all these correctly. Not living by the coast means there’s alot of feathers I’ve never seen before. There is one unknown below, so if you know what it is, leave a comment so the poor thing has a name!

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

Ready for something more exciting, I left for the Bolivar Peninsula, home to the Bolivar Flats. High Island is also a little ways up and Anahuac NWR after that. First was the half hour drive to the ferry.

One of the two ferries.

One of the two ferries.

After parking on the boat, you’re free to roam around, though most people don’t. It’s not a long trip to the other side. For a birder, the ferry is great. Anhingas, Cormorants, Pelicans, and Gulls are right there in front of you and there are many opportunities for birds in flight (BIF) photos. I do advise not using an extender here because the birds are so close (and big).When you get tired of that, watch for dolphins. They did not come far out of the water when I was watching but it is still exciting. They love swimming a few feet away from the bow of large ships, so that’s a good place to watch.

Did not expect to see dolphins.

Did not expect to see dolphins.

 

Small sample of the birds at Bolivar Point.

Small sample of the birds at Bolivar Point.

 

Shortly after you arrive, turn right on 17th street and it will dead-end at a jetty. This was a new word for me and when told to look for a jetty, I wasn’t sure what I was supposed to be looking for. When you walk out onto the jetty, you can view the south side of the flats and an impressive site it is. Thousands of birds. The picture above is just a portion of what you’ll see. The tiny shorebirds, such as plovers, come in closer since they have shorter legs and the bigger birds are further out. I wonder if a higher tide would have brought some of them in closer.

 

Long, rocky walk ahead on the jetty.

Long, rocky walk ahead on the jetty.

One of the most interesting birds I saw was the following. I found it hopping around the jetty once. No idea what it is. Would welcome any insight.

Unknown bird.

Unknown bird.

This was just plain fun. I’m not exactly sure how far out I walked, but I was here for over two hours. Below are some of favorite photos.

Willet. Again.

Willet. Again.

Beautiful Snowy Egret.

Beautiful Snowy Egret.

Short-billed Dowitcher

Short-billed Dowitcher, my first I think.

Ruddy Turnstone, also a first.

Ruddy Turnstone, also a first.

Marbled Godwit (much better than the previous day)

Marbled Godwit (much better than the previous day)

Sanderling, I think. First!

Sanderling, I think. First!

Little Blue Heron strutting its stuff.

Little Blue Heron strutting its stuff.

Neotropic Cormorant. Again, not first, but much better than previous.

Neotropic Cormorant. Again, not first, but much better than previous.

I might have stayed longer, but food was calling. The peninsula is not highly populated and you certainly won’t find any major food chains. I stopped at Guideaux’s, located in a new-looking shopping center. Really good hamburger, definitely recommended. It’s hard to believe that only in 2008, Hurricane Ike destroyed much of this area.

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